Dennis Wheatley Library of the Occult - Williams novels

Thoughts on Charles Williams & Dennis Wheatley Part 2

A couple of weeks ago, I shared an essay on thriller novelist Dennis Wheatley (whose influenced Ian Fleming and others) and his interesting part in promoting the books of Charles Williams. A new post, giving my concluding thoughts and some suggestions about why Williams and Wheatley's careers took such different turns, has now been published. …

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Thoughts on West Side Story: The Novel

One of the joys of writing book reviews is that sometimes you discover a book you really didn't expect to enjoy. I picked up a copy of West Side Story: A Novelization just after Christmas in a mall bookstore for two reasons: first, it's a reprint of a novelization written for the original film, and …

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My Review: Cari Mora by Thomas Harris

While my fiction writing so far has mostly been in the sci-fi/fantasy genre with ventures into ghost stories, I keep telling myself I should write a thriller. I enjoy the well-tuned psychological games, the tension and the chase between hunter and hunted. As I mentioned in my MovieThoughts series on Patricia Highsmith's Ripley novels, I …

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Something for International Tolkien Reading Day: The Hobbit, Contractor’s Edition

As many of you may know, today is International Tolkien Reading Day. Many fans and scholars are getting together today to read sections of his work. I had the pleasure to attend the Inkling Folk Fellowship's reading event, where people read from The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, and Lord of the Rings. A few people read …

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Dennis Wheatley Library of the Occult - Williams novels

Some thoughts on Charles Williams and Dennis Wheatley

I've talked quite a lot about C.S. Lewis on my blog over the years, and his circle of friends known as the Inklings. One of his more mysterious friends was Charles Williams, who was (among other things) a playwright, a Dante scholar who got Dorothy L. Sayers hooked on The Divine Comedy, and a writer …

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Wounds Are Where Light Enters: Stories of God’s Intrusive Grace by Walter Wangerin

Counting this review, I have had 355 published reviews since my first one in December 2015. This review for Power Book Review felt special for several reasons. One, it was for a new website started by a friend I deeply respect, and find a little intimidating. Two, this is the last memoir by Walter Wangerin, Jr. (1944-2021), who would have been 78 years old in 13 days. I felt very privileged to review Songs from the Silent Passage: Essays on the Works of Walter Wangerin, Jr., and even more privileged to share my thoughts on this book.

Power Book Review

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ A very rare Christian memoir that captures life’s chaos and its redemptive moments, without letting one element strangle the other.

🖋 🖋🖋🖋🖋 The writing is stylish without being overdone, intense without being melodramatic.


Published November 21, 2017 by Zondervan

ISBN: 9780310240051

Genre: Memoir, Christian Nonfiction

🔪 One or two chapters describe death or threats of violence.

💋 One or two stories reference sexual violence among inner-city families.

🚩 🚩 🚩 🚩 🚩 Many chapters refer to people facing racist behavior, systemic poverty, and (occasionally) sexual abuse.


Across his career, pastor and writer Walter Wangerin (1944-2021) was many things. Many remember him best for his fantasy novel The Book of the Dun Cow or his religious nonfiction book Ragman and Other Cries of Faith. However, many would argue that the key to Wangerin’s work is that above all else, he was a pastor. Wounds are Where Light Enters collects a…

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Movie poster for 2021 film Nightmare Alley. Source: https://sobrosnetwork.com/2021/12/14/vse-nightmare-alley/

William Lindsay Gresham: A Life

Today, I was part of a presentation by Inkling Folk Fellowship about Nightmare Alley, a bestselling noir novel by William Lindsay Gresham recently made into a film by Guillermo del Toro. Readers familiar with Shadowlands, the movie about C.S. Lewis' marriage to Joy Davidman Gresham, may know that William Gresham was her first husband. Gresham's …

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Title page for "Tidings of Comfort & Joy: A Fellowship & Fairydust Literary Christmas Newsletter." Image copyright 2021 by Fellowship & Fairydust

A Christmas Reflection, published by Fellowship & Fairydust

Several weeks ago, I was attending a writers' group meeting where we were each given a challenge: write a story about one of your strongest Christmas memories. I wasn't sure what to write about. The thing about being born in place, living in a different continent from age 3-10, plus various travels to Asia and …

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Nightmare Alley meets That Hideous Strength

In my last post, I shared a book review of William Lindsay Gresham's Nightmare Alley, an under-read noir novel with an odd connection to the Inklings. A Pilgrim in Narnia just published a longer piece I wrote about the book and it's odd parallels to C.S. Lewis's That Hideous Strength. You can read it here: …

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Movie poster for 2021 film Nightmare Alley. Source: https://sobrosnetwork.com/2021/12/14/vse-nightmare-alley/

Resurrecting a classic: My review of Nightmare Alley

As you probably know from reading many of my blog posts, I enjoy C.S. Lewis' work and am fascinating by his life. One of the odd side subjects in his story is that his wife, Joy Davidman, was originally married to New York writer William Lindsay Gresham. Gresham wrote a variety of things (everything from …

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